Category Archives: Healthcare

use for healthcare

Heads Up to Avert a Covid-19 ‘Doomsday’

Rochelle Walensky, MD, the director of the federal Center for Disease Control, is a forthright person and for that she’s to be praised. On March 21, Ms. Walensky advised :

“When I first started at CDC about 2 months ago, I made a promise to you: I would tell you the truth even if it was not the news we wanted to hear. Now is one of those times when I have to share the truth, and I have to hope and trust you will listen. I’m going to pause here, I’m going to lose the script, and I’m going to reflect on the recurring feeling I have of impending doom.”

“Doom” because too many people, principally younger people, aren’t heeding appeals to continue taking COVID-19 seriously  and have been having a springtime fling. Witness, notes WebMD, the “spring break crowds (that)  have overwhelmed some areas, such as southern Florida. Governors and health officials have expressed concerns about the latest coronavirus data in their states.”

It isn’t fair when people turn aside advisories of the health risks their behavior might well inflict on others. Covid-19 is a silent killer – hence Ms. Walensky’s doomsday warning.

We need more community-based thinking and response in the midst of a continuing pandemic.  Look around – vaccinations are gaining ground, but there are risks aplenty remaining

Ever So Important: A President’s Priorities

There came upon my iMac screen a Washington Post story that made it exceptionally clear how President Trump has failed to serve as the leader the American people have needed during the coronavirus pandemic.  It should illustrate for all future presidents how to get their priorities right: The people first and always.

The Post gave the piece an appropriate heading:  “The inside story of how Trump’s denial, mismanagement  and magical thinking led to the pandemic’s dark winter.”

Should we need reminding on what a president is elected to do, it’s to pick the right aims on behalf of the people and to lead in accomplishing them. As, for example, wearing face masks early on to help check the spread of the virus while seeking ways to counter it, principally vaccines. Donald Trump still is hardly ever seen with a face mask.

A president also establishes his staff’s priorities: “After their warnings had gone largely unheeded for months in the dormant West Wing, Deborah Birx, Anthony S. Fauci, Stephen Hahn and Robert Redfield together sounded new alarms, cautioning of a dark winter to come without dramatic action to slow community spread.

“White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows, among the many Trump aides who were infected with the virus this fall, was taken aback, according to three senior administration officials with knowledge of the discussions. He told the doctors he did not believe their troubling data assessment. And he accused them of outlining problems without prescribing solutions.”

“The doctors explained that the solutions were simple and had long been clear – among them, to leverage the power of the presidential bully pulpit to persuade all Americans to wear masks, especially the legions of Trump supporters refusing to do so, and to dramatically expand testing.”

On and on the Post’s piece goes, along with the virus’ largely unchecked spread.

Tips for the Virus-Wary

Healthline.com has assembled a group of medical experts to discuss the  coronavirus in its present and future contexts. It’s not a happy outlook, but we’d best be aware of what’s ahead.

The first thing is to avoid multiple contacts in crowds and to purchase face masks when they become available. (Drug stores are likely to be out of them more regularly than not.)

Coronavirus is described as “a bullet train without the constraint of train tracks. It is moving very fast in many directions at the same time.” That means the virus will likely be everywhere before much longer. So start taking precautions, say, with your next breath.  If it eases off in a month or two, it’s “likely to recur next fall”. Seriously.

You probably know by now that younger people have a far better chance of   besting the coronavirus than older ones, but that will always be germane.

It’s likely to be 18 months before the U.S. has an effective vaccine for the coronavirus. We could go on, but there’s more first-hand information in the Healthline post. Check it out directly. (And learn how to stop touching your face.)

Downplaying the Coronavirus

The presumptive President of the United States, Donald Trump, says the Democrats are “politicizing” the coronavirus, that it’s “their new hoax” – that’s what he was saying at a rally yesterday in South Carolina. Of course, Trump isn’t our “presumptive” president at all, he’s for real in the role – and that could mean woe is us.

The President, of course, has placed Vice President Mike Pence in charge of coordinating the federal response to the virus threat. From Trump’s tone yesterday, Pence shouldn’t have much to do, and we know that’s not the case at all.  The first death from the virus has just been reported in Washington State, And the virus appears to be spreading up and down the West Coast and heading inland.

Scoffing can be taken too far. Defenders of the President say he didn’t call the virus itself a hoax.  But if there were ever a time for choosing one’s words carefully, this is it and Trump spoke rather spitefully.

There are times when Trump’s handling of his nation-leading job seems as much prompted by whimsy as reality, and this is one of them.  We should be expecting more of the President – caution in the face of a health hazard that threatens us all. Yet the coronavirus is “the Democrats’ new hoax”. We couldn’t let that one pass by. That wouldn’t be fair to a nation whose apprehension is growing  over the prospect of the virus spreading from coast to coast.

Let’s hope it doesn’t, but let’s not downplay the possibility either.