Electoral Delusion a National Risk

Unfortunately, I’m returning to the subject of Donald Trump, this time in his doings as a private citizen. They are ominous.

Paul  Waldman, a Washington Post columnist, writes: “Former president Donald Trump went to Arizona  Saturday (Jan. 15) for a rally of the faithful, and what was most disturbing wasn’t even Trump’s own litany of lies and conspiracy theories. If you sat through Trump’s tired recitation of the old hits, you’d think he was slipping into irrelevance, a pathetic loser trying to convince a dwindling cadre of fans he was still relevant.

“No, what mattered about the event was the parade of Arizona politicians who came to pay tribute to him, one more extreme than the next, each there because they hope they can ride Trump’s support to their own positions of power. 

“And they just might.”

The American system relies on free and fair elections. When a losing candidate alleges that because he lost,  an election was rigged, he discredits the process on which democracy is based. And when voters, in this instance fans of Donald Trump, cheer him on for making such an assertion, the system is threatened by their acceptance of a delusion.

Then. when candidates for other state or national offices ride along on the cheers, as in Arizona, the damage is magnified.

You almost get the sense that American history isn’t being taught in schools and colleges any longer, or that the voters involved in the deception weren’t learning from their teachers. That suggests a more profound disconnect than “simply” a political one. 

A great nation needs to be grounded in accuracy and reality, lest it slip into chaos.

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